January 05, 2024

The Pond Garden at Chanticleer draws visitors like a magnet. Water features always do. Five ponds surrounded by blousy gardens are found at the bottom of the long hillside that begins at the garden’s entrance. This is Part 6 of my visit to Chanticleer during the Philadelphia Area Fling last September.

I explored Chanticleer twice during the Fling — well, once before the Fling began and again during the soiree that Chanticleer treated us to. Lotuses were looking otherworldly with their antennae-like seedpods and satellite-dish leaves.

Golden flowers stood tall…

…and stretched rayed petals like little suns.

Cleome offering up whiskery pink flowers

During the late afternoon of my second visit, I spotted a great blue heron stalking koi. Those koi are huge, but maybe there are smaller ones in there too?

Still as a statue, it waited at the pond’s edge. I waited and watched too.

The koi appeared to pay it no mind. Could they see it?

Slowly it leaned over…

…ready to strike…

…but after a few minutes it straightened back up. I watched for a while and then moved on. I’m afraid I’m not much of a hunter myself.

Those koi are friendly as dogs when they think dinner is forthcoming.

A wisteria arbor overlooks the ponds, offering a shady retreat with throne-like chairs at the base of the hill.

Contemporary planters in a stacked composition overflow with a sedge waterfall.

The Pond Garden path leads through an arching tree tunnel…

…and down to a spring house, where I spotted another water bowl, this one containing a yellow waterlily and duckweed.

Near the Asian Woods, a grassy path winds between the ponds and a screen of tall trees.

The wall of trees opens up to reveal a round glade, where four chairs line up for a view of the Pond Garden.

A perfect resting spot

Turning around, you have a view all the way back up to the big house.

Heading to the Gravel Garden, I spotted a broken grave marker set in the gravel path. “Faithful and True,” it reads, 1934 to 1938, and a few letters of a name, perhaps Dixie. A beloved pet of the Rosengartens, the original owners of Chanticleer, perhaps?

Up next: The beautiful Gravel Garden at Chanticleer. For a look back at the shady Asian Woods at Chanticleer, click here:

To read about my past visits to Chanticleer’s Pond Garden, follow these links:

Every passage is a destination at Chanticleer, October 2021

Flowers and rich foliage at Chanticleer’s Pond Garden, June 2016

Pond Garden, July 2008

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

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Digging Deeper

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance; simply click this link and ask to be added. The Season 7 lineup can be found here.

All material © 2024 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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The Pond Garden at Chanticleer draws visitors like a magnet. Water features always do. This time it drew a great blue heron as well.… Read More
The post Wading into Chanticleer’s Pond Garden appeared first on Digging.Read MoreDigging

January 05, 2024

The Pond Garden at Chanticleer draws visitors like a magnet. Water features always do. Five ponds surrounded by blousy gardens are found at the bottom of the long hillside that begins at the garden’s entrance. This is Part 6 of my visit to Chanticleer during the Philadelphia Area Fling last September.

I explored Chanticleer twice during the Fling — well, once before the Fling began and again during the soiree that Chanticleer treated us to. Lotuses were looking otherworldly with their antennae-like seedpods and satellite-dish leaves.

Golden flowers stood tall…

…and stretched rayed petals like little suns.

Cleome offering up whiskery pink flowers

During the late afternoon of my second visit, I spotted a great blue heron stalking koi. Those koi are huge, but maybe there are smaller ones in there too?

Still as a statue, it waited at the pond’s edge. I waited and watched too.

The koi appeared to pay it no mind. Could they see it?

Slowly it leaned over…

…ready to strike…

…but after a few minutes it straightened back up. I watched for a while and then moved on. I’m afraid I’m not much of a hunter myself.

Those koi are friendly as dogs when they think dinner is forthcoming.

A wisteria arbor overlooks the ponds, offering a shady retreat with throne-like chairs at the base of the hill.

Contemporary planters in a stacked composition overflow with a sedge waterfall.

The Pond Garden path leads through an arching tree tunnel…

…and down to a spring house, where I spotted another water bowl, this one containing a yellow waterlily and duckweed.

Near the Asian Woods, a grassy path winds between the ponds and a screen of tall trees.

The wall of trees opens up to reveal a round glade, where four chairs line up for a view of the Pond Garden.

A perfect resting spot

Turning around, you have a view all the way back up to the big house.

Heading to the Gravel Garden, I spotted a broken grave marker set in the gravel path. “Faithful and True,” it reads, 1934 to 1938, and a few letters of a name, perhaps Dixie. A beloved pet of the Rosengartens, the original owners of Chanticleer, perhaps?

Up next: The beautiful Gravel Garden at Chanticleer. For a look back at the shady Asian Woods at Chanticleer, click here:

To read about my past visits to Chanticleer’s Pond Garden, follow these links:

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance; simply click this link and ask to be added. The Season 7 lineup can be found here.

All material © 2024 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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