January 31, 2023

I moved my fountain to the edge of the covered patio this winter, to free myself from the near-daily task of cleaning out crape myrtle litter during the summer. Another upside is that now I can watch birds at the fountain from my office window.

A few days ago I spotted several cedar waxwings lined up along the rim and dipping down to drink. All that berry hunting is hard work!

I took pictures through my window (glass and screen), so they aren’t crisp. But I was happy to capture the birds’ antics without scaring them off. Cedar waxwings are sleekly beautiful birds with smooth gray feathers, black mask, yellow rump, and flicker of red on their wings.

The water cooler gang turned out to be part of a cedar waxwing convention in the backyard. I looked out the kitchen window and saw fluttering confetti swirling through the air — waxwings by the dozens, a hundred maybe! With my binoculars I could see birds landing on a tree beyond our fence and dipping into a cavity. Aha! That hollow is holding water from a recent drizzle — a natural bird bath.

It’s likely a mosquito incubator in the summer, dang it. But I’m glad to know wildlife like these visiting birds have water sources I hadn’t even known about — and high in a tree, to boot!

Come back any time, my feathered friends.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added. You can find this year’s speaker lineup here.

Make plans to attend the Budding Out Plant Sale & Festival on March 18 at the John Fairey Garden in Hempstead, TX. Rare and distinctive plants will be offered, as well as art, ceramics, jewelry, food, drink, music, and other entertainment for the whole family. Members have early access and get in free. Non-member admission is $5. Children 12 and under are free.

Experience the Surreal Garden at Zilker Botanical Garden, an enchanting neon-art display throughout the gardens, with food and drink, music and dancing, surreal performers, and interactive art sculptures. Surreal costumes encouraged! 25% of event proceeds benefit the Zilker Botanical Garden Conservancy. Runs April 6 (VIP Night), April 7-8, and April 13-15, from 6:30 pm to 11 pm.

All material (C) 2023 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The post Thirsty cedar waxwings come in for a drink appeared first on Digging.

Cedar waxwings were lined up along the rim of the fountain and dipping down to drink. All that berry hunting is hard work!… Read More
The post Thirsty cedar waxwings come in for a drink appeared first on Digging.Read MoreDigging

January 31, 2023

I moved my fountain to the edge of the covered patio this winter, to free myself from the near-daily task of cleaning out crape myrtle litter during the summer. Another upside is that now I can watch birds at the fountain from my office window.

A few days ago I spotted several cedar waxwings lined up along the rim and dipping down to drink. All that berry hunting is hard work!

I took pictures through my window (glass and screen), so they aren’t crisp. But I was happy to capture the birds’ antics without scaring them off. Cedar waxwings are sleekly beautiful birds with smooth gray feathers, black mask, yellow rump, and flicker of red on their wings.

The water cooler gang turned out to be part of a cedar waxwing convention in the backyard. I looked out the kitchen window and saw fluttering confetti swirling through the air — waxwings by the dozens, a hundred maybe! With my binoculars I could see birds landing on a tree beyond our fence and dipping into a cavity. Aha! That hollow is holding water from a recent drizzle — a natural bird bath.

It’s likely a mosquito incubator in the summer, dang it. But I’m glad to know wildlife like these visiting birds have water sources I hadn’t even known about — and high in a tree, to boot!

Come back any time, my feathered friends.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added. You can find this year’s speaker lineup here.

Make plans to attend the Budding Out Plant Sale & Festival on March 18 at the John Fairey Garden in Hempstead, TX. Rare and distinctive plants will be offered, as well as art, ceramics, jewelry, food, drink, music, and other entertainment for the whole family. Members have early access and get in free. Non-member admission is $5. Children 12 and under are free.

Experience the Surreal Garden at Zilker Botanical Garden, an enchanting neon-art display throughout the gardens, with food and drink, music and dancing, surreal performers, and interactive art sculptures. Surreal costumes encouraged! 25% of event proceeds benefit the Zilker Botanical Garden Conservancy. Runs April 6 (VIP Night), April 7-8, and April 13-15, from 6:30 pm to 11 pm.

All material (C) 2023 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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