November 09, 2022

Before Halloween I took a few photos of whatever caught my eye, starting with the whale’s tongue agave in the tractor-rim planter. Hello, gorgeous!

Somebody is watching me from the far end of the Berkeley sedge lawn.

Hello, deer. Oh, and the Wheeler’s sotol that replaced the ‘Green Goblet’ agave (killed by Snowpocalypse) is getting some size on it and looking good. Another bonus: bucks don’t bother rubbing their antlers on a sotol’s flexible leaves. No more agave caging required!

In the back garden, this potted squid agave needed more than a year to recover from its near-death experience during Snowpocalypse. But it finally did. I’m glad I found the patience to give it time to look a little slumpy and sad. I waited, pruning off the lower arms that turned brown, and eventually it perked up. Back to full squid glory! Firecracker fern and foxtail fern add low, soft texture around it.

I acquired this replacement ‘Monterrey Frost’ squid agave after losing a big one to Snowpocalypse. It’s one of my favorite agaves for bright shade.

Near the Circle Garden, ‘Fireworks’ gomphrena adds purple-pink globes.

And in the lower garden, the blue-bottle “ocotillo” seems to wave at a pair of bristling Yucca rostrata.

The back of the house as seen from the lower garden steps. I don’t often photograph from this viewpoint.

Up on the sunny deck, another squid agave — an old one that barely survived Snowpocalypse — basks in the sun. Its companions are a spineless prickly pear and cascading ghost plant thriving in the squid’s shade.

Inside, a fall bouquet with a few squash and mini pumpkins glows with rich fall color. I’m looking forward to cooler weather soon that reflects the season, predicted for Friday — a drop from 82F to 61F for the high temps. Bring it!

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added. You can find this year’s speaker lineup here.

All material (C) 2022 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The post Spotlight around the garden appeared first on Digging.

Before Halloween I took a few photos of whatever caught my eye in the garden, starting with the whale’s tongue agave. Hello, gorgeous!… Read More
The post Spotlight around the garden appeared first on Digging.Read MoreDigging

November 09, 2022

Before Halloween I took a few photos of whatever caught my eye, starting with the whale’s tongue agave in the tractor-rim planter. Hello, gorgeous!

Somebody is watching me from the far end of the Berkeley sedge lawn.

Hello, deer. Oh, and the Wheeler’s sotol that replaced the ‘Green Goblet’ agave (killed by Snowpocalypse) is getting some size on it and looking good. Another bonus: bucks don’t bother rubbing their antlers on a sotol’s flexible leaves. No more agave caging required!

In the back garden, this potted squid agave needed more than a year to recover from its near-death experience during Snowpocalypse. But it finally did. I’m glad I found the patience to give it time to look a little slumpy and sad. I waited, pruning off the lower arms that turned brown, and eventually it perked up. Back to full squid glory! Firecracker fern and foxtail fern add low, soft texture around it.

I acquired this replacement ‘Monterrey Frost’ squid agave after losing a big one to Snowpocalypse. It’s one of my favorite agaves for bright shade.

Near the Circle Garden, ‘Fireworks’ gomphrena adds purple-pink globes.

And in the lower garden, the blue-bottle “ocotillo” seems to wave at a pair of bristling Yucca rostrata.

The back of the house as seen from the lower garden steps. I don’t often photograph from this viewpoint.

Up on the sunny deck, another squid agave — an old one that barely survived Snowpocalypse — basks in the sun. Its companions are a spineless prickly pear and cascading ghost plant thriving in the squid’s shade.

Inside, a fall bouquet with a few squash and mini pumpkins glows with rich fall color. I’m looking forward to cooler weather soon that reflects the season, predicted for Friday — a drop from 82F to 61F for the high temps. Bring it!

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added. You can find this year’s speaker lineup here.

All material (C) 2022 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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