January 09, 2024

Every time I visit Chanticleer’s Gravel Garden, I get a familiar feeling. Many plants we grow in Central Texas appear in this Pennsylvania dry garden, and it’s fun to see them in a new context. Although the garden bristles with yuccas, agaves, and cactus and sways with grasses and airy perennials, the backdrop of tall trees and lush gardens shows that it’s situated in a most un-Texas landscape.

This is Part 7 of my visit to Chanticleer during the Philadelphia Area Fling last September.

From the Pond Garden, a narrow gravel track winds up a steep slope through meadowy plantings.

Looking back at the ponds below

In late September, the fall perennials were in full flower, alongside maples starting to turn.

Pines — not something you’d see in Central Texas

But Yucca rostrata? Oh yeah! How surprising to see it growing on a Pennsylvania hillside, no?

A living bouquet at my feet

A tucked-away seating area in the Gravel Garden

View from the benches

A pruned-up agave, which has no doubt been moved indoors for the winter.

Stone steps lead to a bench along one side of the hilly garden.

Beyond the bench, Minder Woods offers a shady woodland garden to explore. But let’s take in more of the sunny Gravel Garden.

So pretty with diaphanous grasses and bobblehead yuccas and meadowy perennials all around

A vine-shaded arbor curves along the edge of the hillside, overlooking the ponds and other gardens.

A tall boxed cactus stands out amid low flowering plants.

And mouse-eared prickly pear

Looking ahead to the Ruin Garden — next post!

These cone-like seedpods charmed me. They look like little chocolate roses.

Gulf muhly and eryngium gone to seed, along with sparkling white flowers

Another look

Russian sage and that cactus

Beyond, I spy Chanticleer’s famous stone-sofa living room.

As I mentioned earlier in this series, I visited Chanticleer twice on this trip, once before the Fling began and again during an afternoon soiree Chanticleer hosted for us. Drink tables and a bar were set up just beyond a stone armchair.

Angie Lueschen (Minnesota) found a comfy spot on the stone sofa. Notice the stone remote perched on the sofa arm.

Angie was joined by Natalie Carmolli (Michigan), Margo Rabb (Pennsylvania), and Amy Ellsworth DeWald of Decolonize the Garden (Maryland) — all new Flingers, I believe, except Natalie. It was great to meet them!

Margo introduced me to Joe Henderson, one of Chanticleer’s incredibly creative horticulturists.

Looming in the background, the half-shrouded Ruin calls to you with open doors and windows. Let’s explore that next time.

Up next: The fairy tale Ruin Garden at Chanticleer. For a look back at Chanticleer’s lush Pond Garden, click here:

To read about my past visits to Chanticleer’s Gravel Garden, follow these links:

Gravel garden at Chanticleer reminds me of Texas, October 2021

Chanticleer rocks a Gravel Garden, June 2016

Ruin & Gravel Garden, July 2008

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

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Digging Deeper

Come learn about gardening and design at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, authors, and gardeners a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance; simply click this link and ask to be added. Season 8 kicks off in fall 2024. Stay tuned for more info!

All material © 2024 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The post Rocking a dry garden at Chanticleer’s Gravel Garden appeared first on Digging.

Many plants we grow in Central Texas appear in Chanticleer’s Gravel Garden, and it’s fun to see them in a new context.… Read More
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January 09, 2024

Every time I visit Chanticleer’s Gravel Garden, I get a familiar feeling. Many plants we grow in Central Texas appear in this Pennsylvania dry garden, and it’s fun to see them in a new context. Although the garden bristles with yuccas, agaves, and cactus and sways with grasses and airy perennials, the backdrop of tall trees and lush gardens shows that it’s situated in a most un-Texas landscape.

This is Part 7 of my visit to Chanticleer during the Philadelphia Area Fling last September.

From the Pond Garden, a narrow gravel track winds up a steep slope through meadowy plantings.

Looking back at the ponds below

In late September, the fall perennials were in full flower, alongside maples starting to turn.

Pines — not something you’d see in Central Texas

But Yucca rostrata? Oh yeah! How surprising to see it growing on a Pennsylvania hillside, no?

A living bouquet at my feet

A tucked-away seating area in the Gravel Garden

View from the benches

A pruned-up agave, which has no doubt been moved indoors for the winter.

Stone steps lead to a bench along one side of the hilly garden.

Beyond the bench, Minder Woods offers a shady woodland garden to explore. But let’s take in more of the sunny Gravel Garden.

So pretty with diaphanous grasses and bobblehead yuccas and meadowy perennials all around

A vine-shaded arbor curves along the edge of the hillside, overlooking the ponds and other gardens.

A tall boxed cactus stands out amid low flowering plants.

And mouse-eared prickly pear

Looking ahead to the Ruin Garden — next post!

These cone-like seedpods charmed me. They look like little chocolate roses.

Gulf muhly and eryngium gone to seed, along with sparkling white flowers

Another look

Russian sage and that cactus

Beyond, I spy Chanticleer’s famous stone-sofa living room.

As I mentioned earlier in this series, I visited Chanticleer twice on this trip, once before the Fling began and again during an afternoon soiree Chanticleer hosted for us. Drink tables and a bar were set up just beyond a stone armchair.

Angie Lueschen (Minnesota) found a comfy spot on the stone sofa. Notice the stone remote perched on the sofa arm.

Angie was joined by Natalie Carmolli (Michigan), Margo Rabb (Pennsylvania), and Amy Ellsworth DeWald of Decolonize the Garden (Maryland) — all new Flingers, I believe, except Natalie. It was great to meet them!

Margo introduced me to Joe Henderson, one of Chanticleer’s incredibly creative horticulturists.

Looming in the background, the half-shrouded Ruin calls to you with open doors and windows. Let’s explore that next time.

Up next: The fairy tale Ruin Garden at Chanticleer. For a look back at Chanticleer’s lush Pond Garden, click here:

To read about my past visits to Chanticleer’s Gravel Garden, follow these links:

Gravel garden at Chanticleer reminds me of Texas, October 2021

Chanticleer rocks a Gravel Garden, June 2016

Ruin & Gravel Garden, July 2008

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Come learn about gardening and design at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, authors, and gardeners a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance; simply click this link and ask to be added. Season 8 kicks off in fall 2024. Stay tuned for more info!

All material © 2024 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The post Rocking a dry garden at Chanticleer’s Gravel Garden appeared first on Digging.

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