August 06, 2023

I spotted a sotol convention while I was in Marfa in far West Texas last week. The spherical, toothy plants — I think these are Texas sotol (Dasylirion texanum) — are growing in a long grid in front of the Chinati Foundation’s John Chamberlain Building on the main street through town.

We passed by numerous times, and each time I exclaimed over the bristling plants and their skinny, tall-as-a-flagpole bloom spikes.

After dinner one evening, we walked over and meandered among the sotols.

The building’s warm, sandy stucco makes a pretty backdrop to the architectural plants, including this ocotillo.

Golden-tipped sotol bloom spikes leaned over our heads in every direction.

Striking yuccas also show off their spiky geometry in front of the building’s stepped roofline.

Desert plants always look fantastic against a wall.

Hair-like filaments are ready to catch the light.

Some of the big old sotols were lying down, resting their trunks on the ground and splaying their strappy leaves like a peacock’s tail.

My friend Cat posed here with her beautiful cactus bag, which a friend of hers hand stitched.

Sotol spikes with the Marfa water tower in the distance

Sotol is a lovely, desert-tough plant, made even more striking through a grid planting of dozens of them.

Up next: A visit to a private Marfa garden designed for spiritual healing. For a look back at my sightseeing of buildings and landscapes in Marfa, click here.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

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Digging Deeper

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance; simply click this link and ask to be added. The Season 7 lineup can be found here.

All material (C) 2023 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The post Marfa’s masses of sotols at John Chamberlain Building appeared first on Digging.

Spherical, toothy sotols grow in a long grid in front of Marfa’s John Chamberlain Building, and they’re all in bloom right now…. Read More
The post Marfa’s masses of sotols at John Chamberlain Building appeared first on Digging.Read MoreDigging

August 06, 2023

I spotted a sotol convention while I was in Marfa in far West Texas last week. The spherical, toothy plants — I think these are Texas sotol (Dasylirion texanum) — are growing in a long grid in front of the Chinati Foundation’s John Chamberlain Building on the main street through town.

We passed by numerous times, and each time I exclaimed over the bristling plants and their skinny, tall-as-a-flagpole bloom spikes.

After dinner one evening, we walked over and meandered among the sotols.

The building’s warm, sandy stucco makes a pretty backdrop to the architectural plants, including this ocotillo.

Golden-tipped sotol bloom spikes leaned over our heads in every direction.

Striking yuccas also show off their spiky geometry in front of the building’s stepped roofline.

Desert plants always look fantastic against a wall.

Hair-like filaments are ready to catch the light.

Some of the big old sotols were lying down, resting their trunks on the ground and splaying their strappy leaves like a peacock’s tail.

My friend Cat posed here with her beautiful cactus bag, which a friend of hers hand stitched.

Sotol spikes with the Marfa water tower in the distance

Sotol is a lovely, desert-tough plant, made even more striking through a grid planting of dozens of them.

Up next: A visit to a private Marfa garden designed for spiritual healing. For a look back at my sightseeing of buildings and landscapes in Marfa, click here.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance; simply click this link and ask to be added. The Season 7 lineup can be found here.

All material (C) 2023 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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