April 01, 2021

A few years ago I hung from a tree a dish planter with a few sprigs of ghost plant (Graptopetalum paraguayense) tucked around a variegated squid agave — each one a cutting or pup from existing plants in my garden. A bunch of leftovers. And now it’s grown into a combo that thrills me in every season, especially spring, when the cascading ghost plant goes starry with pale yellow flowers on long stems.

I mean. It’s a pastel confection of dusty pink rosettes with aqua centers. A profusion of straw-yellow flowers bristle from every rosette. in the center, a spearmint-green squid agave (A. bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’), her ivory stripes echoing the ghost plant’s flowers, arches her tentacled arms over the scene.

Shazam! Ghost plant is generally winter-hardy here in Austin. But because it’s in a hanging planter (i.e., exposed), I always take it down and put it in a sheltered spot on the ground (for warmth) during ordinary freezes. During the Arctic Freeze From Hell, I brought it indoors.

The sunsets have been on fire lately — compensation for the freeze-blasted bareness of the garden? This one from a couple days ago wowed me with shades of coral, mango, and gold.

Dusty violet soon followed, which always reminds me of Austin’s nickname, City of the Violet Crown.

By the way, I’ve updated my post about the Big Freeze to reflect the current status of plants I could only speculate about 6 weeks ago. Scroll down to “5 days post-freeze – Feb. 24: How much green is left?” for the updates.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.

_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark! Hungry to learn about garden design from the experts? I’m hosting a series of talks by inspiring garden designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. (While in-person talks are currently on hiatus due to the pandemic, I plan to resume again as soon as possible.) Talks are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material (C) 2021 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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Ghost plant and a variegated squid agave have grown into a combo that thrills me in spring, when the ghost plant erupts in tiny yellow flowers…. Read More
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April 01, 2021

A few years ago I hung from a tree a dish planter with a few sprigs of ghost plant (Graptopetalum paraguayense) tucked around a variegated squid agave — each one a cutting or pup from existing plants in my garden. A bunch of leftovers. And now it’s grown into a combo that thrills me in every season, especially spring, when the cascading ghost plant goes starry with pale yellow flowers on long stems.

I mean. It’s a pastel confection of dusty pink rosettes with aqua centers. A profusion of straw-yellow flowers bristle from every rosette. in the center, a spearmint-green squid agave (A. bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’), her ivory stripes echoing the ghost plant’s flowers, arches her tentacled arms over the scene.

Shazam! Ghost plant is generally winter-hardy here in Austin. But because it’s in a hanging planter (i.e., exposed), I always take it down and put it in a sheltered spot on the ground (for warmth) during ordinary freezes. During the Arctic Freeze From Hell, I brought it indoors.

The sunsets have been on fire lately — compensation for the freeze-blasted bareness of the garden? This one from a couple days ago wowed me with shades of coral, mango, and gold.

Dusty violet soon followed, which always reminds me of Austin’s nickname, City of the Violet Crown.

By the way, I’ve updated my post about the Big Freeze to reflect the current status of plants I could only speculate about 6 weeks ago. Scroll down to “5 days post-freeze – Feb. 24: How much green is left?” for the updates.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.

_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark! Hungry to learn about garden design from the experts? I’m hosting a series of talks by inspiring garden designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. (While in-person talks are currently on hiatus due to the pandemic, I plan to resume again as soon as possible.) Talks are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material (C) 2021 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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