July 10, 2022

We visited a number of gardens with ponds at the Garden Bloggers Fling in Madison, Wisconsin, last month. Tom Kuster, who was not a gardener at the time, inherited his pond with the house he and wife Cheryl purchased in 1990. Did the pond work its magic on him, converting him into a passionate gardener? He didn’t say what sparked his interest, but by 2004 he’d hired a designer to create a design he could install himself, and he soon became obsessed with “the vast array of plants available.”

Tom characterizes himself as a plant collector. On an ordinary suburban lot, he’s amassed more than 600 different varieties of plants, organized by genera into 20 sections of his yard. Not being a collector type myself, I simply wandered, admiring the pretty pond and waterfall realistically tucked into a wooded slope along the back of the yard.

The fishpond is nicely fringed with low plants and sedges and a couple of accent conifers.

I also admired this foliage combo — shapes and shades of green — along the property line.

Orange nasturtiums tumble over the edge of a tall cobalt (or purple?) planter against a golden-green shrub — a nice color combo.

And I love the shaggy texture and shade-brightening gold of this stepping-stone path lined with Japanese forest grass.

No idea what this is, but it’s handsome with forest-green leaves and snow-white flowers.

Ah, hostas. Such a foreign sight for these Texas eyes, and so pretty among the reddish tree trunks.

Another eye-catching shade combo

Nice hair

Clematis were blooming all over Madison. Spectacularly. I dub them the Madison Fling’s signature plant.

Allium fireworks in the front garden

And near the front porch, these two grassy-headed pot people — representing the plant-loving owners, perhaps?

Up next: The native-prairie, wildlife-friendly Grosz Garden. For a look back at Part 1 and Part 2 of the Brazill-Golbach Garden, click here.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark! Hungry to learn about garden design from the experts? I’m hosting a series of talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added. The 6th season kicks off in fall 2022.

All material (C) 2022 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The post Foliage-rich pond garden: Kuster Garden at Madison Fling appeared first on Digging.

Tom Kuster has amassed 600 varieties of plants in his garden. The avid plant collector has also created a pleasingly rich tapestry of foliage…. Read More
The post Foliage-rich pond garden: Kuster Garden at Madison Fling appeared first on Digging.Read MoreFeedzy

July 10, 2022

We visited a number of gardens with ponds at the Garden Bloggers Fling in Madison, Wisconsin, last month. Tom Kuster, who was not a gardener at the time, inherited his pond with the house he and wife Cheryl purchased in 1990. Did the pond work its magic on him, converting him into a passionate gardener? He didn’t say what sparked his interest, but by 2004 he’d hired a designer to create a design he could install himself, and he soon became obsessed with “the vast array of plants available.”

Tom characterizes himself as a plant collector. On an ordinary suburban lot, he’s amassed more than 600 different varieties of plants, organized by genera into 20 sections of his yard. Not being a collector type myself, I simply wandered, admiring the pretty pond and waterfall realistically tucked into a wooded slope along the back of the yard.

The fishpond is nicely fringed with low plants and sedges and a couple of accent conifers.

I also admired this foliage combo — shapes and shades of green — along the property line.

Orange nasturtiums tumble over the edge of a tall cobalt (or purple?) planter against a golden-green shrub — a nice color combo.

And I love the shaggy texture and shade-brightening gold of this stepping-stone path lined with Japanese forest grass.

No idea what this is, but it’s handsome with forest-green leaves and snow-white flowers.

Ah, hostas. Such a foreign sight for these Texas eyes, and so pretty among the reddish tree trunks.

Another eye-catching shade combo

Nice hair

Clematis were blooming all over Madison. Spectacularly. I dub them the Madison Fling’s signature plant.

Allium fireworks in the front garden

And near the front porch, these two grassy-headed pot people — representing the plant-loving owners, perhaps?

Up next: The native-prairie, wildlife-friendly Grosz Garden. For a look back at Part 1 and Part 2 of the Brazill-Golbach Garden, click here.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark! Hungry to learn about garden design from the experts? I’m hosting a series of talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added. The 6th season kicks off in fall 2022.

All material (C) 2022 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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