July 17, 2022

Glorious clematis vines greeted us at nearly every garden we visited during the Madison Fling last month, but Janet Aaberg’s garden stepped it up a notch. Thirty-two different varieties of these starry-flowered vines grow in her garden, and every one appeared to be in full bloom.

This nodding blue clematis greeted us in the sunny back garden.

It’s hard to see in this bright-sun photo, but it’s trellised on a shed with a garage door brightened up with a sunflower mural.

A much bigger purple clematis scrambles up the side of the building.

Just look at all those flowers!

And here I’ve been feeling proud of the sputtering blooms on my own two or three clematis vines eking out an existence under the Texas Death Star.

There were also tall delphiniums to admire.

But back to the star of the show, at least for me.

I love ’em all. And notice the dragonfly perching on the garden ornament in the foreground.

Speaking of garden art, Janet has a fun collection.

I admired this circular arbor too — a moon gate to a pergola-shaded sitting area in the center of the garden.

More lovely clematis

And lilies

These beauties are widely grown in Madison gardens too.

Janet displayed this charming chalk sign to welcome us to her garden. On the reverse, another message expressed thanks for including her on the tour. Thank YOU, Janet, for sharing your delightful garden with us!

Up next: The shady, smile-inducing garden of Jim Ottney and Jay Hatheway. For a look back at Allen Centennial Garden, a free public garden on the UW campus, click here.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark! Hungry to learn about garden design from the experts? I’m hosting a series of talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added. The 6th season kicks off in fall 2022.

All material (C) 2022 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The post Constellations of clematis at Janet Aaberg Garden appeared first on Digging.

Thirty-two varieties of clematis grow in Janet Aaberg’s Wisconsin garden, and every one appeared to be in full bloom…. Read More
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July 17, 2022

Glorious clematis vines greeted us at nearly every garden we visited during the Madison Fling last month, but Janet Aaberg’s garden stepped it up a notch. Thirty-two different varieties of these starry-flowered vines grow in her garden, and every one appeared to be in full bloom.

This nodding blue clematis greeted us in the sunny back garden.

It’s hard to see in this bright-sun photo, but it’s trellised on a shed with a garage door brightened up with a sunflower mural.

A much bigger purple clematis scrambles up the side of the building.

Just look at all those flowers!

And here I’ve been feeling proud of the sputtering blooms on my own two or three clematis vines eking out an existence under the Texas Death Star.

There were also tall delphiniums to admire.

But back to the star of the show, at least for me.

I love ’em all. And notice the dragonfly perching on the garden ornament in the foreground.

Speaking of garden art, Janet has a fun collection.

I admired this circular arbor too — a moon gate to a pergola-shaded sitting area in the center of the garden.

More lovely clematis

And lilies

These beauties are widely grown in Madison gardens too.

Janet displayed this charming chalk sign to welcome us to her garden. On the reverse, another message expressed thanks for including her on the tour. Thank YOU, Janet, for sharing your delightful garden with us!

Up next: The shady, smile-inducing garden of Jim Ottney and Jay Hatheway. For a look back at Allen Centennial Garden, a free public garden on the UW campus, click here.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Digging Deeper

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark! Hungry to learn about garden design from the experts? I’m hosting a series of talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance. Simply click this link and ask to be added. The 6th season kicks off in fall 2022.

All material (C) 2022 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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