August 15, 2023

Yellowstone is the only place in the United States where bison have lived continuously since prehistoric times, the national park service tells us. And in that time, bison have really learned how to play — apparently right from birth!

Calves just wanna have fun

We were in Yellowstone National Park‘s Lamar Valley in mid-May, during our RV trip across the West, and newborn calves with umbilical cords still attached were frolicking.

And gamboling

I took a ton of pictures of calves playing one morning. I hope you enjoy these favorites of the bunch.

That face! The one on the left is having so much fun.

Time to eat

Wallowing

Bison cows were shedding their winter coats and wallowing in the dirt.

Side-eye

As one cow got ready for a good wallow, yellow-headed blackbirds gathered nearby, picking through the prairie grass.

Wallow time

Ahhhhh

All done

Bison traffic jam

Bison took charge of Yellowstone’s roads whenever they wished, creating traffic backups.

Just daring you to make his day

At last they relented and moved uphill.

All except one

Bridge stampede

Another time we watched a herd of bison crossing a bridge over the Yellowstone River. They spooked halfway across and took off running…

…then swerved to cross the road…

…wary of cars…

…and headed uphill to graze.

I enjoyed seeing bison of all age ranges and sizes in this herd.

End of the road

At one overlook, we were admiring a horseshoe bend in the river…

…and odd rock pinnacles…

…when our daughter spotted something below, at the water’s edge.

A bison carcass, the horns and hide still visible. Did the animal fall off the cliff or get washed downstream, we wondered?

Meanwhile, bison remain on the move in Yellowstone, as they’ve done since prehistoric times in this amazing place.

Up next: A bonanza of even more wildlife at Yellowstone, part 3. For a look back at grizzlies and geysers in Yellowstone, part 1, click here.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

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Digging Deeper

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance; simply click this link and ask to be added. The Season 7 lineup can be found here.

All material (C) 2023 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

The post Bison kick up their heels at Yellowstone, part 2 appeared first on Digging.

Bison play, romp, nurse, wallow, stampede, and block traffic with regularity at Yellowstone National Park…. Read More
The post Bison kick up their heels at Yellowstone, part 2 appeared first on Digging.Read MoreDigging

August 15, 2023

Yellowstone is the only place in the United States where bison have lived continuously since prehistoric times, the national park service tells us. And in that time, bison have really learned how to play — apparently right from birth!

We were in Yellowstone National Park‘s Lamar Valley in mid-May, during our RV trip across the West, and newborn calves with umbilical cords still attached were frolicking.

And gamboling

I took a ton of pictures of calves playing one morning. I hope you enjoy these favorites of the bunch.

That face! The one on the left is having so much fun.

Time to eat

Bison cows were shedding their winter coats and wallowing in the dirt.

Side-eye

As one cow got ready for a good wallow, yellow-headed blackbirds gathered nearby, picking through the prairie grass.

Wallow time

Ahhhhh

All done

Bison took charge of Yellowstone’s roads whenever they wished, creating traffic backups.

Just daring you to make his day

At last they relented and moved uphill.

All except one

Another time we watched a herd of bison crossing a bridge over the Yellowstone River. They spooked halfway across and took off running…

…then swerved to cross the road…

…wary of cars…

…and headed uphill to graze.

I enjoyed seeing bison of all age ranges and sizes in this herd.

At one overlook, we were admiring a horseshoe bend in the river…

…and odd rock pinnacles…

…when our daughter spotted something below, at the water’s edge.

A bison carcass, the horns and hide still visible. Did the animal fall off the cliff or get washed downstream, we wondered?

Meanwhile, bison remain on the move in Yellowstone, as they’ve done since prehistoric times in this amazing place.

Up next: A bonanza of even more wildlife at Yellowstone, part 3. For a look back at grizzlies and geysers in Yellowstone, part 1, click here.

I welcome your comments. Please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post. And hey, did someone forward this email to you, and you want to subscribe? Click here to get Digging delivered directly to your inbox!

__________________________

Come learn about garden design from the experts at Garden Spark! I organize in-person talks by inspiring designers, landscape architects, and authors a few times a year in Austin. These are limited-attendance events that sell out quickly, so join the Garden Spark email list to be notified in advance; simply click this link and ask to be added. The Season 7 lineup can be found here.

All material (C) 2023 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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